Hospitality and Leisure

ACKNOWLEDGING THE RISKS

The hospitality industry and hotels in particular, have limited regulation and guidance for cybersecurity as comparing to other industries, as a result companies are less focused on cybersecurity related risks, while the risks remain the same.
Hotels rely on decentralised digital networks made up of many components accessed by many people. High turn over rates, processing of large amounts of personal and financial information by booking management software, point-of-sale systems and extensive use of Wi-Fi networks and multimedia services which lack basic security safeguard and controls many times, present massive risks to the industry.
Large amounts of sensitive data, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII), are collected and kept within these networks making them targets for cyber crime and criminal activity, such as:

  • Malwares, and Ransomware in particular
  • Phishing attempts
  • Data theft by malicious insiders

These different systems are also becoming increasingly integrated with one another. While this integration offers immense benefit to hoteliers and guests alike, the diffuse nature of these networks makes them inherently vulnerable to cyber attacks. Just as a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, a network is only as secure as its most vulnerable point.
The damage following a security breach is four-fold:

  • Direct costs of computer hacks, and fraudulent activity
  • Revenue loss from system downtime and lost business
  • Legal fees and fines, especially if there is any suspicion that your company is not meeting its data protection and GDPR obligations
  • Reputation damage and rehabilitation

Engineering and Construction

ACKNOWLEDGING THE RISKS

The Engineering and Construction industries are growing complexity, rely heavily on extensive global supply chain to drive their business growth. While technology introduces higher productivity, it also creates vulnerabilities and exposure to risk. From security systems to booking management software to point-of-sale systems to Wi-Fi networks and environmental controls, the future of hotel management is digital.

  • A distributed workforce
  • File and data sharing outside the company
  • High personnel turnover

Large amounts of sensitive data, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII), are collected and kept within these networks making them targets for cyber crime and criminal activity, such as:

  • Malwares, and Ransomware in particular
  • Phishing attempts
  • Data theft by malicious insiders

These different systems are also becoming increasingly integrated with one another. While this integration offers immense benefit to hoteliers and guests alike, the diffuse nature of these networks makes them inherently vulnerable to cyber attacks. Just as a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, a network is only as secure as its most vulnerable point.
The damage following a security breach is four-fold:

  • Direct costs of computer hacks, and fraudulent activity
  • Revenue loss from system downtime and lost business
  • Legal fees and fines, especially if there is any suspicion that your company is not meeting its data protection and GDPR obligations
  • Reputation damage and rehabilitation

Consumer Goods

ACKNOWLEDGING THE RISKS

Highly dis, rely on heavily on extensive global supply chain to drive their business growth. From security systems to booking management software to point-of-sale systems to Wi-Fi networks and environmental controls, the future of hotel management is digital.

  • A distributed workforce
  • File and data sharing outside the company
  • High personnel turnover

Large amounts of sensitive data, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII), are collected and kept within these networks making them targets for cyber crime and criminal activity, such as:

  • Malwares, and Ransomware in particular
  • Phishing attempts
  • Data theft by malicious insiders

These different systems are also becoming increasingly integrated with one another. While this integration offers immense benefit to hoteliers and guests alike, the diffuse nature of these networks makes them inherently vulnerable to cyber attacks. Just as a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, a network is only as secure as its most vulnerable point.
The damage following a security breach is four-fold:

  • Direct costs of computer hacks, and fraudulent activity
  • Revenue loss from system downtime and lost business
  • Legal fees and fines, especially if there is any suspicion that your company is not meeting its data protection and GDPR obligations
  • Reputation damage and rehabilitation

Managing The Risk

Recovering from a security breach is incredibly costly. It is therefore essential to build cyber resilience into every aspect of your information technologies. Strategic and targeted investment now will save your business money and safeguard its reputation now and into the future.

  • Gain visibility over your main assets and related cyber risks to your company
  • Create a cybersecurity strategy and define your defence tactics
  • Protect your IT assets, including networks, software and mobile devices
  • Manage the cyber risk related to your suppliers
  • Invest in your employees awareness toward cybersecurity threats

Cynance can identify and prioritise high risk areas of your network, neutralising potential threats before they become a problem. Direct investment in the security of your IT infrastructure , and creating confidence for shareholders and partners alike that your brand is strong and trustworthy.